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mizuna

We bought some beautiful feathery red and green mizuna from David of Suncakes Gardens at the Farmers’ Market. When I seized it with enthusiasm, David asked me how I was planning to use it.  Mizuna is a mild-tasting member of the mustard/cabbage family. It thrives in a Waikato winter.

Even I can grow it, but we never have enough in the garden.  

 

mizunagarden.jpg

Mizuna in my garden: there's never enough of it. 

Three good things to do with mizuna

1. Winter salad (my favourite)

Mizuna makes a distinctive, textured, crunchy, slightly tangy salad. Chop the leaves and stalks into 1cm pieces. Add half a cup (or more) of daikon cut into match-stick sized pieces, and a finely chopped spring onion.

Mix with the following dressing: 1 Tablespoon Asian-style sesame oil, juice of one lime, salt to taste, and a small amount of sugar (maybe half a teaspoon) to balance the flavours. Sprinkle 2 Tablespoons of toasted sesame seeds over the top of the salad before serving.

2. Asian-style noodle soup

A couple of handfuls of mizuna, finely chopped, go into the broth a couple of minutes before you pour it over the noodles. Wonderful on a cold winter day. This is a gold standard chicken noodle soup, full of healing qualities. Here's a link to my chicken broth recipe. A vege broth with a tablespoon of miso added at the time of serving is also great.

3. In a stir-fry

Mizuna, stir-fried with garlic and ginger, or with other winter veges. It only needs a couple of minutes of cooking.

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This is a blog about showcasing the delicious abundance of the Waikato region. Such wonderful food deserves celebration and appreciation.

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ABOUT THE WRITER

My name is Alice and I love local food. For more, see the "About" page.